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This page houses archived copies of posts and materials published on the PEC website since 2014. Use the tools below to search or browse legacy content including publications, handouts, maps and trail information, audio and video, blog posts, newsletters, and more.

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In the Laurel Highlands Conservation Landscape, DCNR and National Park Service frontline staff are learning about what the region has to offer beyond the boundaries of the parks and forests where they work. The result: a more closely networked Landscape, and a better experience for visitors.  
A local water utility with an acid mine drainage problem. A liberal arts college with an ambitious carbon-reduction goal. A collection of nonprofits and government agencies working in reforestation. What do they have in common? They’re all working together to restore native woodlands on a reclaimed mining site in Cambria County.
On Wednesday, May 18th, PEC hosted the annual Western Pennsylvania Dinner at the Westin Pittsburgh with the theme “Celebrating the Outdoor Recreation Economy.” After a two-year hiatus from the annual in-person dinner, this was an opportunity to debut new elements, including exhibitors representing different facets of Pennsylvania’s outdoor recreation sector. Outfitters, retailers, state agencies, conservation organizations, recreation enthusiasts, and even mapmakers were among those who joined us to share their perspectives on the outdoors. The first round of speakers for the evening focused on Pennsylvania’s thriving outdoor economy and the opportunities that have arisen over the past two years as interest…
PEC works with many groups to improve water quality in the Delaware River Basin by encouraging the use of Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI). GSI is a solution that can be deployed at almost any scale — from big commercial properties all the way down to residential backyards.
What does a local Audubon chapter have in common with a solar-powered business incubator? They’re both making a difference in northeastern Pennsylvania by building community connections around environmental projects. The Stourbridge Project and the Greater Wyoming Valley Audubon Society were awarded 2021 Northeast PA Environmental Partnership awards for their work to build relationships with and improve their region. In addition its business incubator programs, the Stourbridge Project provides coworking space, a prototyping lab, and educational programs to the community at low- or no-cost. Its most recent addition is a 33 KW rooftop photovoltaic system. “When you have a building based on innovation and moving…
State and federal agencies. Hunters and anglers. Elementary schools. A privately owned landfill. What do they all have in common? In northeastern Pennsylvania, they’re working together to protect wildlife habitat and educate neighbors about local flora and fauna. Every year the Northeast Environmental Partners recognize projects and initiatives that demonstrate the power of broad-based collaboration for meeting environmental challenges, an ethic PEC calls “conservation through cooperation.” Often the most impactful cooperation happens at the intersection of shared interests, overlapping missions, and mutually beneficial outcomes like those jointly pursued by these 2021 Northeast Environmental Partnership awardees: Alliance Landfill received an award…
The Great Allegheny Passage is one of Western Pennsylvania’s major tourist destinations, and one of the country’s most popular rail trails. It receives over a million visits each year, and that number only continues to grow. Over its 150 miles from Cumberland, MD to Pittsburgh, the GAP has an enormous impact, not only on the individuals that visit the trail, but on the towns and counties through which it travels. A new analysis by consulting firm Fourth Economy helps quantify the impact of the GAP on the region. Overall, they found that the regional economic impact for 2019 from GAP…
After last year’s successful virtual dinner, the Northeast Environmental Partners — the Pennsylvania DCNR, Pennsylvania DEP, PEC, PPL Corporation, Procter & Gamble Paper Products Company, and Wilkes University — decided to host the 2021 Northeast Environmental Partnership Awards Dinner virtually as well. The online program included speeches celebrating the awardees from DCNR Secretary Cindy Dunn, DEP Northeast Regional Director Michael Bedrin, and PEC President Davitt Woodwell. The rest of the evening provided an opportunity for the awardees to discuss their accomplishments themselves through pre-recorded videos. The event as a whole was a great success, and we had a wonderful time honoring…
Bartram’s Garden is the 2021 recipient of PEC’s Special Places Award as part of the 51st Philadelphia Environmental Partnership Dinner. This public park and 50-acre National Historic Landmark is a destination, outdoor classroom, and living laboratory for ever-expanding programs and audiences. Bartram’s Garden is a place where people of all ages can access the Lower Schuylkill River for boating, fishing, and exploring and is Southwest Philly’s backyard, partnering with local creators, educators, entrepreneurs, and leaders. The agricultural legacy and modern commitment to food sovereignty takes root at the Sankofa Community Farm at Bartram’s.  
On June 19th, paddlers gathered at Riverside Park in Greenville, PA to celebrate the Shenango River as 2021’s River of the Year. The sojourn was hosted by the nominating organization, the Shenango River Watchers. Each year, the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources works in partnership with PEC and the Pennsylvania Organization for Watersheds and Rivers (POWR) to organize the River of the Year awards and accompanying events. The winner is chosen through a public voting process, and this year — for the first time ever — voters chose the Shenango. “It’s remarkable that the little Shenango beat out…
As a result of planning decisions made decades ago, communities throughout suburban Philadelphia struggle with flooding and other negative impacts from heavy rainfall. These conditions don’t just affect residential properties, which account for the bulk of land use in the Wissahickon and Tookany/Tacony-Frankford watersheds — they’re also linked with broader environmental problems like streambank erosion, pollution and sedimentation, habitat loss, and encroaching invasives. But suburban homeowners, perhaps more than any one group of stakeholders, have a special role to play in addressing these challenges. “We recognize this whole area was developed before there was any kind of stormwater management,” said…
For over a century the residents of Hazelwood have been cut off from the Monongahela River, even though the historic Pittsburgh neighborhood sits right on its banks. Now there’s a community-driven plan to reconnect the community with the water, while recognizing and preserving remnants of the industries that once separated them. As a partner in the Hazelwood Riverfront planning process, PEC is helping to tell the story of the site’s transformation through the words of the community leaders and planners who are making it happen. In advance of the April 7 community meeting where residents will get their first look…